Everything You Need to Know About Thesis 1.0

by Chris Pearson · 209 comments

Many of you have already gotten a first-hand look at the new options panel in Thesis 1.0, but there are tons of other improvements that I’m sure you’ll be interested in as well. I’ll reference the options panel throughout this article, but my primary goal here is to address some of the lesser-known bits of goodness in this new release.

Robust Multimedia Box Options

In version 0.3, the multimedia box allowed users to choose between rotating images and embedded video, but customizing the thing involved a fair amount of code-wrangling. I hate forcing users to enter a coding environment that they may not be comfortable with, and as a result, I focused on creating flexible, easy-to-use options to control the multimedia box.

Thesis 1.0 allows you to utilize the multimedia box area in a variety of ways. You can:

  • Use the new, automated image rotator
  • Embed a video
  • Embed custom code
  • Disable the box by default
  • Override the default settings and display an image, video, or code on individual posts and pages via the use of custom fields!

Best of all, you can control these settings from within the WordPress dashboard and on the post/page editing screens—no coding is required!

Smart Image Rotation

If you intend to use the image rotator in the multimedia box area, you’re going to love the improvements to this part of the theme. All you have to do is load up the /rotator folder with the images you want to use, and Thesis will handle everything else for you.

Image alt tag options

The real hidden beauty here is all of the stuff Thesis does with your images. First, the theme will automatically discover your new images and add them to the rotation roster. Next, it will check the size of the image, and if it is a standard aspect ratio, Thesis will assign the appropriate size class to the image. Finally, if you’ve supplied an alt tag in the options panel (as shown in the image), the theme will add that to the resulting img tag output.

Oh, and for the record, the Thesis image rotator plays quite nicely with images that fit the most common aspect ratios, including:

  • 3×2
  • 2×3
  • 4×3
  • 16×9
  • 4×5

One of the hottest support topics with prior versions of Thesis was the navigation menu, and hopefully, the custom nav menu builder in the new options panel will bring some method to the madness. You can add any of your site’s Pages, any category archive page, and any external link that you like to the menu, and you can do it all from within the Thesis options panel. Best of all, the interface is extremely simple, so even the biggest n00b can create a killer navigation menu without having to touch a bit of code!

Completely New File Structure

Thesis 1.0 is considerably smarter than its predecessors, and in order to achieve some of the new functionality, I had to organize theme files and folders a little differently. The most notable change is the consolidation of all user-customized files into a single folder called /custom. Your custom stylesheet, custom.css, is now located inside this folder, and those of you who are upgrading from version 0.3 will need to place your custom stylesheet in this new location.

The /custom folder also contains a user-defined functions file called custom_functions.php. The default file consists of one example function, and its use is based on an article I published about custom functions. Any functions you define in that file will be available for use within the theme’s template files, so the savvy tweakers among you can use that file to accomplish pretty much anything you like.

The final addition to the /custom folder is an /images folder that is intended to house all of your graphical customizations. In your custom stylesheet, you might be accustomed to referring to a background image like so:

body.custom { background: url('images/sample-custom-graphic.gif'); }

The addition of the /images folder preserves filename references like the one used above, and in my opinion, this is an easy, semantically-meaningful way of constructing your custom CSS. Oh, and I suppose it’s worth noting that because this new folder structure consolidates all of your customizations into one location, updates ought to be even easier in the future (specifically, dealing with images will be less of a hassle).

On another note, I’ve omitted a few template files, including:

  • nav_menu.php
  • nav_menu_items.php
  • navigation.php
  • rotating_images.php
  • video_box.php

These files performed roles that are now handled by more robust PHP functions, and as a result, they no longer have a place in the template core.

World’s Easiest RSS Feed Management

In the past, proper setup of your RSS feed typically required the use of a third-party plugin. Also, in prior versions of Thesis, you had to do a tiny bit of code-wrangling to get your feed set up correctly. Now, with Thesis 1.0, all you have to do is drop your feed address in an options box, and boom—instant RSS goodness. Setting up feeds literally cannot get any easier than this.

Simple Stats and Scripts Management

Do you use statistics tracking programs like Mint or Google Analytics? If so, then tell me if this sounds familiar—you upgrade or change your theme, and two days later, you realize you left out the stinkin’ tracking code!

Don’t worry, we’ve all done it! Fortunately, if you’re using Thesis 1.0, you’re never going to have to deal with that again. Once you’ve added your tracking codes to the options panel, Thesis will insert them into the appropriate locations in the markup, and you won’t have to lift a finger!

Are you sensing a trend here? Less coding, more results! It’s the Thesis mantra, I’m tellin’ ya.

With each new release of WordPress, the sidebar Widget control interface becomes more and more useful. Moving forward, one of my primary goals is to achieve total sidebar control from within the Widget interface in the WordPress dashboard, and although we’re not quite there yet, Thesis 1.0 represents a big step in that direction.

Thesis search widget

One of the most noteworthy changes is the fact that I’ve done away with the default Thesis search code. But don’t fret—you can still access it from the Widget control panel, and unlike the default WordPress search widget, you have the option to add a title to this one.

Another noteworthy sidebar addition is the Google Custom Search widget, which will allow you to integrate Google Custom Search without having to do any coding whatsoever. All you have to do is add a title and drop your GCSE code in the designated box, and boom—instant Google Search widgetry on your site!

Finally, I wrote a clever little function that you can use to list any number of recent posts from any category in a special sidebar widget. Although you’ll have to edit one of your sidebar files to take advantage of this, I think you’ll find the process to be pretty simple. For instance, if you want to place the 8 most recent posts from your “Popular” category in a sidebar widget titled “Popular Posts,” you can get the job done with this handy function:

thesis_recent_posts_widget('Popular', 'Popular Posts', 8);

The function, thesis_recent_posts_widget(), accepts three parameters. The first (Popular from the above snippet) is the category slug of the category you want to target. The second (Popular Posts) is whatever you want the title of your resulting widget to be. The third parameter (8) is optional, and it represents the number of posts you want to display. The default value is 5, so if you were to use the following code in either of your sidebar template files:

thesis_recent_posts_widget('Popular', 'Popular Posts');

You would end up with 5 posts from the Popular category in a widget titled “Popular Posts.” Oh, and for the record, this is the exact function I use to generate the “Customization Tips” and “Thesis News” widgets you see in the sidebar of this site. Cool, eh?

Markup and Style Changes

Admittedly, I’m an irrepressible tweaker, and I couldn’t help but change a few stylistic elements of the theme while working on this new version. First, I decided to serve the sidebar headings inside <h3> tags instead of the semantically questionable <h2> tags that were found in previous releases. In addition, I decided to style the sidebar headings differently, opting for small-caps and removing the horizontal borders that resided above and below the text. Those horizontal lines were killin’ the chi in the sidebar, so that’s why I felt it was necessary to remove them.

Also, the keen observers among you will notice that I removed the bullets from list items in the sidebar. The bullets pushed the text over to the right a few pixels, and that, in turn, created a horizontal interruption of the natural rhythm of text in the sidebars. Essentially, all of the sidebar treatments I implemented both simplified and minimized the design on that part of the theme, and as an added benefit, this will make future modifications easier and more efficient to produce.

The next major stylistic change concerns post and page titles. In previous versions, they were served in bold Georgia, but the reasoning behind that was, in my opinion, poor at best. The leading (or line-height in CSS terms) in the content area is 22px, and in order to maintain this leading, I chose a font size of 20px for the titles. This decision allowed me to set a 22px line height and keep multi-line titles from looking awkward, but unfortunately, I always felt that the content area called for larger fonts on the titles.

To compensate, I elected to serve the titles in bold, but the resulting “heaviness” still clashed with the bold site title in the header. On top of all this, I simply don’t like serving post titles in bold Georgia—something about it just doesn’t seem right to me (probably because bold Georgia is just really freakin’ bold).

Ultimately, I decided that maintaining the established leading was neither necessary nor important in the title area. As a result, I increased both the size and the leading of post and page titles in Thesis 1.0, and in addition, I removed the default bold state.

Finally, I reworked a bunch of the CSS that governs the width of the various elements of the theme. Now, you are only a few lines of custom CSS away from different layout widths (like a wider content area, for instance). Even better, this new setup makes it much easier for me to provide tutorials and helpful tips for simple layout width changes!

Microformats Galore

Microformats are an essential piece of the Web standards movement, primarily because they provide predictable, patternized ways of serving markup. In practice, this means that sites featuring robust microformats are going to be as accessible as possible to emerging Web technologies.

What does this mean for you? Ultimately, you want to do everything you can to position yourself for success in the future, and microformats are one area where you can gain some leverage. Simply put, incorporating microformats is a good idea, and that’s why I felt that it was essential to include them in Thesis. The theme is ready for the road ahead, and that kind of peace of mind is often worth the price of admission.

For those of you who are curious about the specifics, Thesis now makes extensive use of the hAtom microformat on post and index pages. Future theme updates will also feature hCard integration in both the post and comment author fields.

Separation of Comments and Trackbacks

Instead of appearing inline with comments, trackbacks will now be generated in a concise, easy-to-read list above the comments. If no trackbacks have been posted, this area simply will not appear, and you’ll see the list of comments just as you would normally expect.

In addition, I focused on tightening up the display behavior surrounding comments and comment status, so you should see marked improvement in those areas as you use the theme. In prior Thesis versions, users noticed some janky behavior when comments were turned off on individual posts (especially after being on). Thesis 1.0 features a much more elegant way of handling these different status scenarios, and now the theme knows how to respond in each unique situation.

Page-specific Classes

When you create a Page in 1.0, Thesis will automatically add the URL slug to the #content div. The idea here is that it will allow you to apply unique custom styles to any Page of your site.

To illustrate, let’s look at a fictitious “About” page that has the slug about. On this example page, the #content div will render like this:

<div id="content" class="about">

Now, if you want to change the link color on the About page only (in this case, to red), you can add the following CSS to your custom stylesheet:

.custom .about .format_text a { color: #c00; }

In theory, you can do some pretty radical modifications on a per-page basis by using this technique, and I’m sure the ambitious among you will come up with some pretty killer implementations!

In every theme I’ve ever created, the previous and next links that appear on paginated index pages have driven me nuts. Even when there were no more posts to show, some of the markup from the previous/next navigation would render, and this usually resulted in a random horizontal line or gray box appearing at the bottom of the post list.

Thanks to a little code-scrubbing, this is no longer the case. From now on, if there are no more posts to show, you won’t see any random gray lines or empty boxes. Anal-retentive theme users rejoice!

Title and Tagline Control

With the flick of a switch in the new options panel, you can turn your site’s title and tagline on or off. Generally, it’s a good idea to leave these elements in your markup, but in certain situations, it may make more sense to ditch one or both of them. Thesis 1.0, benevolent theme that it is, now grants you that capability!

Author and Date Control on Posts and Pages

Thesis byline optionsUnder the Display Options area of the Thesis options panel, you can choose precisely how you want your bylines constructed. For those of you who are not familiar with this terminology, the byline is the line of text beneath the title of a post or page that contains the author name and the published-on date. With Thesis 1.0, you can control the bylines on both posts and pages, and if you like, you can avoid the use of bylines altogether by unchecking all of the applicable options.

Slick Tagging Control (with Microformats!)

In Thesis 1.0, you can turn tagging on or off via a simple switch in the options panel. In addition, if you choose to use tags, you can elect to link them to tag archive pages or to simply display the tags. No matter what you choose, you’ll receive the full benefit of having microformatted tags on your page; but please keep in mind that if you link to tag archive pages, you’ll be increasing the amount of indexed pages on your site unnecessarily. As a general rule, I advise against doing anything that produces “page bloat,” but you still have the option to choose either setup with Thesis.

Stylesheet Changes and Internet Explorer

There are tons of changes to the core stylesheet in 1.0, but very few of those changes actually impact the resulting styles that you see on screen. A lot of the new tweaks are more semantic than anything; for instance, post headlines (<h2>) on index pages in version 0.3 included the dotted, horizontal borders that separate the posts. In 1.0, those borders now belong to the new .post_box element, which contains all the elements from a particular post. To me, it just makes more sense to do it this way—headlines should be used for typographic purposes, not for border separations between posts.

Anyway, there are lots of other changes similar to the one I highlighted above, but they’re simply not worth diving into here.

Oh, and while testing out the theme, I noticed something in IE that I had never noticed before. Basically, under the 0.3 setup, Thesis was rendering just shy of its assigned 960px width in both IE6 and 7. As a result, embedded videos in the multimedia box would cause layouts to “break,” thereby rendering the sidebars beneath the content and to the right.

While exploring this issue, I rediscovered something that I’d completely forgotten—IE does not render decimal percentages properly from the initial font declaration, which looks like this:

body { font: 62.5% Georgia, "Times New Roman", Times, serif; }

IE sees the above font size declaration as 62% instead of 62.5%, and as a result, instead of 1em equaling 10px as designed, 1em in IE equaled 9.9375px. Spread out over 96em, that made Thesis 954px wide in IE instead of 960px, which is how wide the theme is supposed to be. Anyway, I fixed this in 1.0, so world peace should now be restored… at least on all the major browsers.

So yeah, now you guys know what I do for fun.

As far as future development goes, this is just the tip of the iceberg, folks. Subscribe to the Thesis feed, and make sure you’re along for the ride every step of the way!

Thesis users are coding less, accomplishing more, and looking better while doing it. On top of that, the value of their purchase continues to rise dramatically with each new version release. Why miss out on these benefits any longer? You should get Thesis!

About the Author: Chris Pearson, Thesis creator and DIYthemes founder, is obsessed with optimizing the web and making sure every last detail receives the attention it requires. You should follow him on Twitter here.

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{ 202 comments }

Toblerone @ Simple Mom

Insane amount of work you’ve done here, Chris. And I love it! I think Thesis looks amazing now. I really appreciate the changes to sidebar titles and post titles. And of course, I love the navigation menu! Thanks so much – it’s been more than worth the money.

Toblerone @ Simple Mom

Insane amount of work you’ve done here, Chris. And I love it! I think Thesis looks amazing now. I really appreciate the changes to sidebar titles and post titles. And of course, I love the navigation menu! Thanks so much – it’s been more than worth the money.

Tom

This is what we’ve been waiting for since Thesis 1.0 launch! I played with the new Thesis yesterday and this tutorial clarifies many issues I encountered. Honestly, I really love the new tweaks. There is one thing I preffered in 0.3 though – the horizontal borders in sidebar headings. Can you please advise how I can bring them to life again?

Tom

This is what we’ve been waiting for since Thesis 1.0 launch! I played with the new Thesis yesterday and this tutorial clarifies many issues I encountered. Honestly, I really love the new tweaks. There is one thing I preffered in 0.3 though – the horizontal borders in sidebar headings. Can you please advise how I can bring them to life again?

Mikhail

An outstanding job, Chris! Love the changes and how you’ve made it so easy for coding illiterates like me.

You mentioned something about Page-specific Classes and I’ve been struggling to find where to access the code that the About page is rendered in.

If you could kindly point me to that file, it’ll be much appreciated.

Thanks again Chris for all the attention you’ve been giving to this great theme. Can’t wait to see what you’ve cooking in the next update…

Mikhail

An outstanding job, Chris! Love the changes and how you’ve made it so easy for coding illiterates like me.

You mentioned something about Page-specific Classes and I’ve been struggling to find where to access the code that the About page is rendered in.

If you could kindly point me to that file, it’ll be much appreciated.

Thanks again Chris for all the attention you’ve been giving to this great theme. Can’t wait to see what you’ve cooking in the next update…

Rick Beckman

Truly amazing writeup, Chris! I didn’t have the privilege of using any version of Thesis prior to 1.0, but reading about all the work you’ve done on this theme makes me appreciate it all the more.

You rock, man.

Rick Beckman

Truly amazing writeup, Chris! I didn’t have the privilege of using any version of Thesis prior to 1.0, but reading about all the work you’ve done on this theme makes me appreciate it all the more.

You rock, man.

Bruce Keener

Wow, what a great write-up. A superb explanation of the tremendous job you have done with Thesis.

Thanks again for such a wonderful theme and for your incredible support!

Bruce Keener

Wow, what a great write-up. A superb explanation of the tremendous job you have done with Thesis.

Thanks again for such a wonderful theme and for your incredible support!

Lisa

Nice job, Chris! Thanks…

Lisa

Nice job, Chris! Thanks…

Paulo Villela

Chris,
The Thesis each version is better, but what you think of offering a choice of single page with a sidebar on the left and as a sidedar right in Neoclassical theme?
At least here in Brazil, this type of layout has a better profitability.
even more …

Paulo Villela

Chris,
The Thesis each version is better, but what you think of offering a choice of single page with a sidebar on the left and as a sidedar right in Neoclassical theme?
At least here in Brazil, this type of layout has a better profitability.
even more …

Jim Spencer

Impressive focus on making the theme work harder so I don’t have to. I will continue to spread the good word.

Is there anything in the works to make the theme look more like a website than a blog? That would be awesome, and lure some Revolution users.

Jim Spencer

Impressive focus on making the theme work harder so I don’t have to. I will continue to spread the good word.

Is there anything in the works to make the theme look more like a website than a blog? That would be awesome, and lure some Revolution users.

Chris Pearson

Tom — If you’d like your sidebar headings styled like they were in 0.3, place the following code in your custom stylesheet:

.custom .sidebar h3 {
    font-size: 0.846em;
    line-height: 1.455em;
    font-weight: bold;
    margin-bottom: 1em;
    padding: 0.636em 0 0.545em 0;
    font-variant: none;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    color: #111;
    border-top: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #ddd;
}

If you’d prefer to keep the new font and color styles and just add borders, you should use this code instead:

.custom .sidebar h3 {
    padding: 0.538em 0 0.462em 0;
    color: #111;
    border-top: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #ddd;
}

Chris Pearson

Tom — If you’d like your sidebar headings styled like they were in 0.3, place the following code in your custom stylesheet:

.custom .sidebar h3 {
    font-size: 0.846em;
    line-height: 1.455em;
    font-weight: bold;
    margin-bottom: 1em;
    padding: 0.636em 0 0.545em 0;
    font-variant: none;
    text-transform: uppercase;
    color: #111;
    border-top: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #ddd;
}

If you’d prefer to keep the new font and color styles and just add borders, you should use this code instead:

.custom .sidebar h3 {
    padding: 0.538em 0 0.462em 0;
    color: #111;
    border-top: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #ddd;
}

Chris Pearson

Mikhail — Unfortunately, the post slug option in WordPress 2.5+ is crappy when compared to the same option from previous versions of WordPress. In 2.5+, after you type your title into the appropriate field, a permalink field will magically appear beneath the title box. It’s the dumbest interface convention of all time, but it’s cool, right?

Anyway, check out the graphic below to see what I mean—I’m confident that you’ll be able to figure it out from there.

WordPress edit post permalink

Chris Pearson

Mikhail — Unfortunately, the post slug option in WordPress 2.5+ is crappy when compared to the same option from previous versions of WordPress. In 2.5+, after you type your title into the appropriate field, a permalink field will magically appear beneath the title box. It’s the dumbest interface convention of all time, but it’s cool, right?

Anyway, check out the graphic below to see what I mean—I’m confident that you’ll be able to figure it out from there.

WordPress edit post permalink

Chris Pearson

Paulo — In time, I will probably modify Thesis to the point where that is a viable option. In all honesty, though, I’ll likely release Neoclassical on this site before that happens, so I’m thinking you’ll want to go that route!

Chris Pearson

Paulo — In time, I will probably modify Thesis to the point where that is a viable option. In all honesty, though, I’ll likely release Neoclassical on this site before that happens, so I’m thinking you’ll want to go that route!

Chris Pearson

Jim — I built a few unused options into 1.0 with the intention of adding a magazine-style layout in a future release of the theme. By the time 1.1 arrives, you’ll be able to construct a home page that consists of post blurbs, thumbnails, images, and videos, much like you’re used to with the magazine styles.

Chris Pearson

Jim — I built a few unused options into 1.0 with the intention of adding a magazine-style layout in a future release of the theme. By the time 1.1 arrives, you’ll be able to construct a home page that consists of post blurbs, thumbnails, images, and videos, much like you’re used to with the magazine styles.

Tom

Thank you Chris, I have just applied the custom css for the sidebar headings and it works! (no surprise here, heh ;) There is one issue however, as it also adds lines just above the WP search widget, where – in fact – there isn’t any title… Is there a way to add a title to the WP search widget? Or to re-style it to h2 or h4? I’d appraciate any help. Thanks again!

Tom

Thank you Chris, I have just applied the custom css for the sidebar headings and it works! (no surprise here, heh ;) There is one issue however, as it also adds lines just above the WP search widget, where – in fact – there isn’t any title… Is there a way to add a title to the WP search widget? Or to re-style it to h2 or h4? I’d appraciate any help. Thanks again!

Mikhail

Thanks very much for clearing that up for me. And you’re right, that is a pretty nifty feature. You really do mean it when you say Thesis users are coding less and accomplishing more, don’t ‘cha? Cheers man.

Mikhail

Thanks very much for clearing that up for me. And you’re right, that is a pretty nifty feature. You really do mean it when you say Thesis users are coding less and accomplishing more, don’t ‘cha? Cheers man.

Chris Pearson

Tom — Remove the search widget, and then add it again. This time, you should be able to edit the options on that particular widget and add a title (this is a Thesis-only feature, and not part of the WP core).

Chris Pearson

Tom — Remove the search widget, and then add it again. This time, you should be able to edit the options on that particular widget and add a title (this is a Thesis-only feature, and not part of the WP core).

Colin

Another newbie here. Have set up a blog in the last couple of days, for the first time, on Wordpress.com, and was trying out different themes when I came across yours elsewhere, which looked just right. I have bought and downloaded Thesis, but don’t know where to go from here. And now I’ve just discovered there are “two” wordpresses – so can I use it on .com? Please advice…

Colin

Another newbie here. Have set up a blog in the last couple of days, for the first time, on Wordpress.com, and was trying out different themes when I came across yours elsewhere, which looked just right. I have bought and downloaded Thesis, but don’t know where to go from here. And now I’ve just discovered there are “two” wordpresses – so can I use it on .com? Please advice…

Rick Beckman

Colin: Custom themes, like Thesis, cannot be used on WordPress.com; you’ll need a self-hosted install of WordPress (from WordPress.org).

Not only will you get to use Thesis, but you’ll have more direct control over your blog’s data, over advertising on your blog, and all sorts of other stuff.

Rick Beckman

Colin: Custom themes, like Thesis, cannot be used on WordPress.com; you’ll need a self-hosted install of WordPress (from WordPress.org).

Not only will you get to use Thesis, but you’ll have more direct control over your blog’s data, over advertising on your blog, and all sorts of other stuff.

BlogMediaGroup3

Chris,

Re: 1.1 “magazine” plans. Thesis is already the Ferarri of paid themes. Adding “magazine” capability will turn it into a steam-roller.

Ed

BlogMediaGroup3

Chris,

Re: 1.1 “magazine” plans. Thesis is already the Ferarri of paid themes. Adding “magazine” capability will turn it into a steam-roller.

Ed

Chris Pearson

Colin — Sounds like you’re in a bit of a bind here. Just as Rick advised, you cannot use downloadable themes on WordPress.com. You’ll need the self-hosted version of WordPress, which you can download here, in order to run Thesis. The only “gotcha” here is that you also need to purchase Web hosting – a server, essentially – where you can upload both WordPress and Thesis.

In my opinion, setting up and working with your first Web server is an excellent learning experience. If you choose to go this route, you’ll feel empowered once you find yourself on the other side of the learning curve. Not only that, you’ll be free from the constraints and limitations of a fully-hosted platform like WordPress.com (where you can’t even use Thesis—the horror!).

For about two years, I’ve been getting my hosting from ANhosting. They offer simple, 1-click WordPress installations for novice users, and you can also opt for cPanel, which is an easy-to-use server management tool. You’ll probably only use it to create your WordPress database, and if I’m not mistaken, the 1-click WordPress install actually does this for you.

Anyway, check out this article I wrote on things you want to look for in a Web host, and once you reach the end, you ought to be able to make an informed decision about your hosting. If you have any other questions, feel free to email me: diythemes [at] gmail [dot] com.

Chris Pearson

Colin — Sounds like you’re in a bit of a bind here. Just as Rick advised, you cannot use downloadable themes on WordPress.com. You’ll need the self-hosted version of WordPress, which you can download here, in order to run Thesis. The only “gotcha” here is that you also need to purchase Web hosting – a server, essentially – where you can upload both WordPress and Thesis.

In my opinion, setting up and working with your first Web server is an excellent learning experience. If you choose to go this route, you’ll feel empowered once you find yourself on the other side of the learning curve. Not only that, you’ll be free from the constraints and limitations of a fully-hosted platform like WordPress.com (where you can’t even use Thesis—the horror!).

For about two years, I’ve been getting my hosting from ANhosting. They offer simple, 1-click WordPress installations for novice users, and you can also opt for cPanel, which is an easy-to-use server management tool. You’ll probably only use it to create your WordPress database, and if I’m not mistaken, the 1-click WordPress install actually does this for you.

Anyway, check out this article I wrote on things you want to look for in a Web host, and once you reach the end, you ought to be able to make an informed decision about your hosting. If you have any other questions, feel free to email me: diythemes [at] gmail [dot] com.

Chris Pearson

Ed — Am I the only one who’d rather have the Ferrari? :D

Anyway, yes—providing a few different layout options is something I’d deem characteristic of any truly great theme solution, and I’m going to continue to push Thesis in that direction.

Chris Pearson

Ed — Am I the only one who’d rather have the Ferrari? :D

Anyway, yes—providing a few different layout options is something I’d deem characteristic of any truly great theme solution, and I’m going to continue to push Thesis in that direction.

Jeff Raab

Thesis 1.0 is amazing, nice work. Quick question – now that the custom.css file is in the /custom folder, is there any way to edit it within the wordpress admin? It is noticeably absent from the wordpress theme editor. Thanks!

Jeff Raab

Thesis 1.0 is amazing, nice work. Quick question – now that the custom.css file is in the /custom folder, is there any way to edit it within the wordpress admin? It is noticeably absent from the wordpress theme editor. Thanks!

Chris Pearson

Jeff — Unfortunately, that’s probably the biggest drawback of this new setup. In all honesty, though, it wouldn’t be a big deal for WordPress developers to add the ability to navigate theme folders, and if I were in charge, this would already be implemented in the WordPress core.

Regardless, I realize that we have to deal with the present, and as such, you’re going to have to use an external text editor and an FTP client to update your custom stylesheet. Sorry if this is a huge bummer—I hate making decisions that end up having negative consequences for people.

Believe me, no one wants this to be easy and perfect more than I do!

Chris Pearson

Jeff — Unfortunately, that’s probably the biggest drawback of this new setup. In all honesty, though, it wouldn’t be a big deal for WordPress developers to add the ability to navigate theme folders, and if I were in charge, this would already be implemented in the WordPress core.

Regardless, I realize that we have to deal with the present, and as such, you’re going to have to use an external text editor and an FTP client to update your custom stylesheet. Sorry if this is a huge bummer—I hate making decisions that end up having negative consequences for people.

Believe me, no one wants this to be easy and perfect more than I do!

Jeff Raab

no worries. I don’t mind…just a few extra steps. Thanks for the quick reply and keep up the great work.

Jeff Raab

no worries. I don’t mind…just a few extra steps. Thanks for the quick reply and keep up the great work.

Will

Hi Chris! So many new features and almost all of the few that were keeping me from purchase. So now I am finally ready to take the plunge and change my sites to the Thesis theme. Thanks for all your work and your constant attention to maintaining and improving. There is little more frustrating in the WordPress world than getting a theme you like and them having it ignored by it’s author as time goes by.

Will

Hi Chris! So many new features and almost all of the few that were keeping me from purchase. So now I am finally ready to take the plunge and change my sites to the Thesis theme. Thanks for all your work and your constant attention to maintaining and improving. There is little more frustrating in the WordPress world than getting a theme you like and them having it ignored by it’s author as time goes by.

Christina Warren

The theme looks amazing — I just bought it to use as the framework for a site I’ve been developing (and decided that all the time I’ve wasted trying to roll my own could go to better use customizing something awesome) and am thrilled with all the options.

One comment — any word on WordPress 2.6 compatibility? Beta 3 was released yesterday, and the final version is supposed to be out next week. With beta 3, there is a conflict with Thesis (none of the changes in the Thesis options page will apply even after you click them and choose “save”). Not a huge thing, I have 2.5.1 running on my dev-server for just that reason, just curious as to what you think the update timeline will be, as some of the 2.6 features would be nice to use with the project I’m developing.

Great work!

Christina Warren

The theme looks amazing — I just bought it to use as the framework for a site I’ve been developing (and decided that all the time I’ve wasted trying to roll my own could go to better use customizing something awesome) and am thrilled with all the options.

One comment — any word on WordPress 2.6 compatibility? Beta 3 was released yesterday, and the final version is supposed to be out next week. With beta 3, there is a conflict with Thesis (none of the changes in the Thesis options page will apply even after you click them and choose “save”). Not a huge thing, I have 2.5.1 running on my dev-server for just that reason, just curious as to what you think the update timeline will be, as some of the 2.6 features would be nice to use with the project I’m developing.

Great work!

Chris Pearson

Will — No worries in that department here. Thesis has a bright future, and I’ve got lots of work to do!

Christina — Thesis user Bruce Keener informed me about the compatibility issues with WordPress 2.6 a couple of days ago. As far as I can tell, either the 2.6 core is incomplete, or else WordPress has changed the way that themes are able to communicate with the database.

The latter is likely true, and this will only bode well for the future of Thesis. It should open up the door to even more options and functionality, and that sounds good to me!

Chris Pearson

Will — No worries in that department here. Thesis has a bright future, and I’ve got lots of work to do!

Christina — Thesis user Bruce Keener informed me about the compatibility issues with WordPress 2.6 a couple of days ago. As far as I can tell, either the 2.6 core is incomplete, or else WordPress has changed the way that themes are able to communicate with the database.

The latter is likely true, and this will only bode well for the future of Thesis. It should open up the door to even more options and functionality, and that sounds good to me!

Claude

Thanks for such a great theme and awesome upgrades Chris.

I upgraded this past weekend and didn’t run into any trouble. IMO the best feature so far is the options panel now part of the admin screen.

Claude

Thanks for such a great theme and awesome upgrades Chris.

I upgraded this past weekend and didn’t run into any trouble. IMO the best feature so far is the options panel now part of the admin screen.

Tom

Chris, I noticed text renders differently between IE and other browsers. I guess it has to do with that 62.5% font declaration you mentioned. Is there any way to fix it? I work on a Mac and was surprised to see some headings on IE flow to next line while they fit just fine into single line on Safari or Firefox! This can be a pain in the neck when designing small text boxes – like “must see” widgets etc.

Tom

Chris, I noticed text renders differently between IE and other browsers. I guess it has to do with that 62.5% font declaration you mentioned. Is there any way to fix it? I work on a Mac and was surprised to see some headings on IE flow to next line while they fit just fine into single line on Safari or Firefox! This can be a pain in the neck when designing small text boxes – like “must see” widgets etc.

Chris Pearson

Claude — Good to see you here, and thanks for the nice words. You really seemed to latch on to Thesis in prior versions, so I was curious to get your take on this new one. Glad you dig it!

Tom — Actually, what you’re experiencing is one of the most common plights of designers everywhere: fonts simply do not render identically across different platforms. In this case, Georgia appears a little squattier and fatter on Windows at sizes greater than 12 pt. This phenomenon has nothing at all to do with code; instead, it’s a product of the different font rendering engines on each OS.

Typographic design on the Web is, at best, an art of compromise. Some typefaces render more closely over equal horizontal distances than others, but no matter what, you’re not going to see a one-to-one correspondence between platforms.

Chris Pearson

Claude — Good to see you here, and thanks for the nice words. You really seemed to latch on to Thesis in prior versions, so I was curious to get your take on this new one. Glad you dig it!

Tom — Actually, what you’re experiencing is one of the most common plights of designers everywhere: fonts simply do not render identically across different platforms. In this case, Georgia appears a little squattier and fatter on Windows at sizes greater than 12 pt. This phenomenon has nothing at all to do with code; instead, it’s a product of the different font rendering engines on each OS.

Typographic design on the Web is, at best, an art of compromise. Some typefaces render more closely over equal horizontal distances than others, but no matter what, you’re not going to see a one-to-one correspondence between platforms.

Ana

Wow! I’ve been looking for a theme for my blog, and this one is AMAZING! I’ve bookmarked your page for when I have some balance in Paypal! ;)

Ana

Wow! I’ve been looking for a theme for my blog, and this one is AMAZING! I’ve bookmarked your page for when I have some balance in Paypal! ;)

TheWeblogZone

Wow lots of improvements! Thanks for the tremendous work Chris.

Cheers!

TheWeblogZone

Wow lots of improvements! Thanks for the tremendous work Chris.

Cheers!

Oliver

Chris,
there used to be a sitemap.php coming with your Copyblogger theme for writing a sitemap page. With Thesis this sitemap.php is gone. Is it no longer important for seo (google etc.)?

Oliver

Chris,
there used to be a sitemap.php coming with your Copyblogger theme for writing a sitemap page. With Thesis this sitemap.php is gone. Is it no longer important for seo (google etc.)?

Chris Pearson

Oliver — I no longer recommend the use of an HTML sitemap. The biggest reason for this change is the advent of the XML sitemap, which is far more functional than the old-school HTML sitemap. I highly recommend integrating your own XML sitemap using the Sitemap Generator Plugin for WordPress.

Chris Pearson

Oliver — I no longer recommend the use of an HTML sitemap. The biggest reason for this change is the advent of the XML sitemap, which is far more functional than the old-school HTML sitemap. I highly recommend integrating your own XML sitemap using the Sitemap Generator Plugin for WordPress.

Monevator

Chris,

Sorry to put you on the spot, but do you have any rough date in mind for the version 1.1 magazine style front-page layout? I’m looking to buy exactly that sort of theme — and have been looking at decent options from Darren Hoyt, Adii, Brian Gardner and the new One Theme — but for me they all fall down on typography, whereas there your themes have always been a class apart.

While I’m busy wishing, something that enabled me to control the number of columns on the front page (or indeed have it as a seperate layout altogether) thatthen went into the standard Thesis sort of layout when an article was selected would be ideal. I guess with a feature or main story the same width as the post column for grid-like loveliness, maybe with two sub featured stories below and then a blog like listing of other new stories, preferably with optional excerpts (or the more tag) for introduction straps (mag style, as you get with the BBC or Salon say) rather than the messy system some themes use where the excerpt on the front page just ends mid sentence with a ‘…’

Also, I’m not sure about the main image over the two right hand columns once you get into a magazine style posts – it seems too divorced from the content (I think it’s fine with rotating images) – though perhaps that could be neatly addressed if you could add an optional ‘caption’ or boxout field underneath it (maybe a custom field), so you could have a pic that went with the story then a typographically strong 30-40 word boxout/caption, as you get in magazines. Actually, that’s a cool idea. :)

The back-end adsense/ad slot treatment of something like the new One Theme is very handy too. A bit like Darren Hoyt, your themes traditionally don’t seem to focus too much on monetisation, but in reality a lot of us premium users are trying to be mini media moguls, so it’s a big draw :)

Anyway, I’m still tied up with other projects at the moment so I’m hanging on to see what you present with Version 1.1, but at some point I’ll have to make a decision to go with one.

Naturally it’s your project (and mine is only one sale!) so no big potatoes – just a few thoughts from a long time fan. I’ve studied premium mag-style themes quite a bit over the past few months, so at the risk of sounding like I could teach you to suck eggs I could offer you a few more pointers if you’d like on what a potential consumer might look for. (Could email if you prefer, but warn me on the thread as I don’t check that email too often).

Anyway, all the best with the venture: a class act.

Monevator

Chris,

Sorry to put you on the spot, but do you have any rough date in mind for the version 1.1 magazine style front-page layout? I’m looking to buy exactly that sort of theme — and have been looking at decent options from Darren Hoyt, Adii, Brian Gardner and the new One Theme — but for me they all fall down on typography, whereas there your themes have always been a class apart.

While I’m busy wishing, something that enabled me to control the number of columns on the front page (or indeed have it as a seperate layout altogether) thatthen went into the standard Thesis sort of layout when an article was selected would be ideal. I guess with a feature or main story the same width as the post column for grid-like loveliness, maybe with two sub featured stories below and then a blog like listing of other new stories, preferably with optional excerpts (or the more tag) for introduction straps (mag style, as you get with the BBC or Salon say) rather than the messy system some themes use where the excerpt on the front page just ends mid sentence with a ‘…’

Also, I’m not sure about the main image over the two right hand columns once you get into a magazine style posts – it seems too divorced from the content (I think it’s fine with rotating images) – though perhaps that could be neatly addressed if you could add an optional ‘caption’ or boxout field underneath it (maybe a custom field), so you could have a pic that went with the story then a typographically strong 30-40 word boxout/caption, as you get in magazines. Actually, that’s a cool idea. :)

The back-end adsense/ad slot treatment of something like the new One Theme is very handy too. A bit like Darren Hoyt, your themes traditionally don’t seem to focus too much on monetisation, but in reality a lot of us premium users are trying to be mini media moguls, so it’s a big draw :)

Anyway, I’m still tied up with other projects at the moment so I’m hanging on to see what you present with Version 1.1, but at some point I’ll have to make a decision to go with one.

Naturally it’s your project (and mine is only one sale!) so no big potatoes – just a few thoughts from a long time fan. I’ve studied premium mag-style themes quite a bit over the past few months, so at the risk of sounding like I could teach you to suck eggs I could offer you a few more pointers if you’d like on what a potential consumer might look for. (Could email if you prefer, but warn me on the thread as I don’t check that email too often).

Anyway, all the best with the venture: a class act.

Jorge

Thanks for including me in the showcase! You made me a happy man!

Jorge

Thanks for including me in the showcase! You made me a happy man!

Lyndon

Chris you seriously rock!!

I still can’t believe all the changes you’ve made from old version. I think I got eye fatigue about half way through your list ;)

P.S. I can’t believe I made it into your showcase? Thanks for including me in it!

Lyndon

Chris you seriously rock!!

I still can’t believe all the changes you’ve made from old version. I think I got eye fatigue about half way through your list ;)

P.S. I can’t believe I made it into your showcase? Thanks for including me in it!

BlogMediaGroup3

Chris,
Let me second Monevator’s query on a T1.1 timetable. I’d like to use a magazine-style Thesis for my hub, which will be fed by all my T-based blogs.

BlogMediaGroup3

Chris,
Let me second Monevator’s query on a T1.1 timetable. I’d like to use a magazine-style Thesis for my hub, which will be fed by all my T-based blogs.

Alex Tran

+1 for the magazine-style layout and a 1.1 timeframe.

Alex Tran

+1 for the magazine-style layout and a 1.1 timeframe.

Chris Pearson

Monevator, BlogMediaGroup3, and Alex — After careful consideration of the coding changes involved, I’ve decided that it would be best to release a “magazine-style” Thesis layout as a separate theme. The good news, however, is that all current Thesis customers are going to get free access to this new theme. In addition, future customers who sign up through a particular date (TBD as of now) will also have free access to the new magazine-style layout.

Now, regarding the development timeline, I can’t say a specific date when all this will materialize. This week, I’m working on building additional core functionality into Thesis, including:

  • “Edit” links on posts
  • A smarter <title> constructor
  • Header image uploader/manager with auto-implementation
  • Previous/next post link option on single entry pages
  • Option to link rotating images
  • Option to show excerpts or full posts on the home page
  • Rudimentary nav menu sort (not a page-by-page sort, sadly)
  • Some more sidebar widget enhancements

Once I’ve tackled these fundamental development issues, I’m going to go to work on building a world-class magazine setup that offers more flexibility than other themes in this genre. It’s a lot of work, to be sure, but it is definitely something I’d consider a near-term prospect.

Chris Pearson

Monevator, BlogMediaGroup3, and Alex — After careful consideration of the coding changes involved, I’ve decided that it would be best to release a “magazine-style” Thesis layout as a separate theme. The good news, however, is that all current Thesis customers are going to get free access to this new theme. In addition, future customers who sign up through a particular date (TBD as of now) will also have free access to the new magazine-style layout.

Now, regarding the development timeline, I can’t say a specific date when all this will materialize. This week, I’m working on building additional core functionality into Thesis, including:

  • “Edit” links on posts
  • A smarter <title> constructor
  • Header image uploader/manager with auto-implementation
  • Previous/next post link option on single entry pages
  • Option to link rotating images
  • Option to show excerpts or full posts on the home page
  • Rudimentary nav menu sort (not a page-by-page sort, sadly)
  • Some more sidebar widget enhancements

Once I’ve tackled these fundamental development issues, I’m going to go to work on building a world-class magazine setup that offers more flexibility than other themes in this genre. It’s a lot of work, to be sure, but it is definitely something I’d consider a near-term prospect.

Monevator

Chris, thanks for getting back, sounds a great deal — I’m in with the Thesis developer’s license, and look forward to accessing the magazine theme when it’s ready! :)

Monevator

Chris, thanks for getting back, sounds a great deal — I’m in with the Thesis developer’s license, and look forward to accessing the magazine theme when it’s ready! :)

Chris Pearson

Monevator — Welcome aboard! The coming weeks will be the most action-packed here on DIYthemes to date, so be sure to subscribe to the Thesis feed to stay on top of things.

Chris Pearson

Monevator — Welcome aboard! The coming weeks will be the most action-packed here on DIYthemes to date, so be sure to subscribe to the Thesis feed to stay on top of things.

Alda

Chris, I’m in awe. In my eyes you’re freaking Einstein. Congrats on launching the new theme. Being css challenged myself, I don’t know when I’ll attempt the upgrade, but like I said – totally impressed with all your work.

Alda

Chris, I’m in awe. In my eyes you’re freaking Einstein. Congrats on launching the new theme. Being css challenged myself, I don’t know when I’ll attempt the upgrade, but like I said – totally impressed with all your work.

BlogMediaGroup3

Sounds great, Chris. Your plans sound dead-on. If you’ll be adding an “edit” link to T posts, how about adding some “print” code? I can’t tell you enough how much your typography skills enhance my content.

BlogMediaGroup3

Sounds great, Chris. Your plans sound dead-on. If you’ll be adding an “edit” link to T posts, how about adding some “print” code? I can’t tell you enough how much your typography skills enhance my content.

carey suante

I don’t really understand what the hell you are talking about Chris but it sure sound great!!!

carey suante

I don’t really understand what the hell you are talking about Chris but it sure sound great!!!

Lucy

Chris, I am a true DIY-WordPress-user, not a developer. I want to use Thesis, but must be sure of something first. Is it possible to do a custom background for a single page (specifically for each category archive?)? In other words, I want my Home page to look one way, then when you go to another Page, you see a slightly different look. Each additional page would have its own look. Please say yes, and I’ll license today. Thank you.

Lucy

Chris, I am a true DIY-WordPress-user, not a developer. I want to use Thesis, but must be sure of something first. Is it possible to do a custom background for a single page (specifically for each category archive?)? In other words, I want my Home page to look one way, then when you go to another Page, you see a slightly different look. Each additional page would have its own look. Please say yes, and I’ll license today. Thank you.

Wayne

Hi Chris:

How would I go about adding ads to your template?

Thanks

Wayne

Hi Chris:

How would I go about adding ads to your template?

Thanks

Chris Pearson

Alda — Probably the best thing about 1.0 is that it actually decreases the amount of code that you need to know in order to upgrade or make other modifications. After looking over your site, I can see how you could use things like the Analytics code box to consolidate your various tracking codes, etc. But on that same wavelength, I can also see where it would be hugely beneficial if you had some video tutorials to help guide you through this process.

I’m coding up 1.1 and revamping the back-end here on DIY in preparation for a new affiliate program, but once that’s done, I’ll be able to focus on creating some really helpful videos. In the meantime, I recommend tinkering with Thesis on a WordPress installation in a sandbox subdirectory. I’m confident that you’ll be able to figure out the things you need to know in a no-pressure test environment!

Chris Pearson

Alda — Probably the best thing about 1.0 is that it actually decreases the amount of code that you need to know in order to upgrade or make other modifications. After looking over your site, I can see how you could use things like the Analytics code box to consolidate your various tracking codes, etc. But on that same wavelength, I can also see where it would be hugely beneficial if you had some video tutorials to help guide you through this process.

I’m coding up 1.1 and revamping the back-end here on DIY in preparation for a new affiliate program, but once that’s done, I’ll be able to focus on creating some really helpful videos. In the meantime, I recommend tinkering with Thesis on a WordPress installation in a sandbox subdirectory. I’m confident that you’ll be able to figure out the things you need to know in a no-pressure test environment!

Michael

Okay, I am almost sold this is great, maybe I missed a question but I see you have the forums linked in. Does thiesis come with this or will I have to work to get that added into the overall system?

Chris Pearson

Lucy — Version 1.0 provides the ability to style Pages in that manner, but there are a couple of notable shortcomings. First, this type of customized styling is currently restricted to Pages and does not include category archive pages. Second, the placement of the customized CSS class is not high enough in the markup. It should occur at the <body> level, but in 1.0, it occurs at <div id="content">. This precludes setting a different background on the outside of the “page” area of the theme, which is essentially the area inside the white background on this particular page.

Shortly after releasing 1.0, I realized the limitations of setting things up in this manner, and I’ve already made provisions to change that in Thesis 1.1 (which I’m working on this week). I’ll be sure to include the ability to style category archive pages individually, too—I can see lots of cool possibilities there.

Wayne — There are quite a few different ways to incorporate ads into Thesis. For ads inside posts, you can use Thesis’ ad-handling classes. The multimedia box area can also be utilized to display ads on a sitewide or per-page basis. The “custom code” option for the multimedia box accepts JavaScript code, so you could use that to serve Google AdSense ads (or 125×125 ads, etc.).

Yet another way you could place ads in Thesis is through a WordPress text sidebar widget, which will accept any kind of HTML or JavaScript. When Thesis 1.1 arrives, you’ll have 2 new sidebar widgets available that are pre-apportioned for ads, but until then, the text widgets should suffice. The primary difference between the current text widgets and the new, ad-specific widgets is that you’ll have more control over the resulting output (like centering your ads, styling them, etc).

Finally, I’m working on adding more hooks to the theme that will allow you even more flexibility with ad placements. For instance, one of the new hooks will occur after each post, so conceivably, you could serve ads in these locations. I suppose the bottom line here is that it’s already pretty easy to incorporate ads into Thesis, and with each new release, you’ll have even more flexibility in this department.

Chris Pearson

Michael — The Thesis support forums are unique to this site and are not a part of the theme. For the record, they are run on vBulletin, a separate forum software that I had to integrate into the user management system of this site.

Thesis is a powerful WordPress theme that is “intelligent,” inasmuch as it allows you to set options and manage your site through a simple interface without having to mess with code. Of course, if you are experienced with CSS and HTML, then Thesis is also the most customizable framework on the market today. Simply put, it’s built with the user in mind at every juncture, and in a practical setting, that really goes a long way.

christy

Thesis can’t be used on my blog…right?

Chris Pearson

christy — Unfortunately, Thesis is not available for WordPress.com blogs. If you were to switch to the self-hosted WordPress platform, you could run any theme you like.

Rian

Very NYTimes.com-ish. Nice.

Metroknow

This really looks like the solution I’ve been looking for. I just had one question – is it very difficult to customize column width to accommodate 125×125 rotating ads similar to the display on copyblogger? I like the style for blocks of ads (2 ads side by side), and would consider resizing the main and third columns to put ads in the second.

How easy is that to do/does it affect other components?

Thanks again -
Metroknow

Chris Pearson

Metroknow — The widths are all dependent on one another simply because you really don’t want to make the layout any wider than it currently is (for monitor accessibility purposes). Therefore, if you borrow from one, you should add an equivalent amount to another, and vice versa.

Thesis 1.0 features a completely reworked style setup so that you can change all the necessary widths in 4 or 5 CSS declarations. The next version release will likely contain some turkey options for widths, but no matter what, you’ll be able to use the aforementioned 4 or 5 lines of code to make your widths whatever you like at any time.

So, because of this, it really shouldn’t be that difficult to accommodate ads in the manner that you’d like. And hey—I’d be glad to work up some CSS for ya to help you out!

Metroknow

Thanks Chris – your quick response is really impressive considering all the buzz surrounding this release. And I think you just made another $160 bucks for your trouble. Thanks again.

gregory

can i center the main column? can i make it wider? can i convert to two column? can i put two photos side-by-side, spaced apart?

it looks like a wordpress format from fifty paces …. how can i break that look, and still have wordpress, and thesis, functionality?

Alda

Many thanks for the feedback, Chris – and for taking time to look at my site. You’re absolutely right about the sandbox subdirectory (great term!) – as it happens I do have one of those, so as soon as I can carve out some time I’ll start playing around in it :) . As you point out, the upgraded Thesis does sound like a much easier platform.

Incidentally, good thinking about the video tutorials – I’m sure they could help many of us!

Aski

Hi,
Is it easy to localize the thesis theme to another language like Dutch?

Andrew

Hey Chris,

I’m starting a new website using wordpress.org and DreamHost hosting – I want to make sure all the initial ducks are in a row (it’s set up well for SEO, etc. etc.) before I really start adding content and promoting it.

I want to buy Thesis. Today. It looks cool and seems awesome, and your boy Brian Clark really sold me on it today (probably millions of others, too).

Anyway – if I buy the theme, is it simple enough just to upload it as a theme within my WP admin control panel? In other words, do I have to go back to the starting block with the Thesis theme, or can I just buy it, upload it, and then select it as the theme I’m using and everything will work out?

Let me know. This $167 is burning a hole in my pocket.

Kali Lilla

Hey There!
In addition to Andrew’s question above, if I start with Thesis now and then want to use the magazine version that’s coming, will all my content flow into the new magazine theme when I select it? Sorry for the novice question. I’m new to WP. :)

Andrew

Duuuude. Thesis is AWESOME. It is a Must-Buy. My site is certainly in it’s infancy, but with Thesis, I foresee a bright future.

This really is the best WordPress theme around. Chris, you do awesome work. Best $167 I ever spent on something G-rated.

Chris Pearson

gregory — You can modify the column widths with just a few lines (4–6) of custom CSS, and you could use this same principle to create a two-column layout as well. Also, Thesis is equipped with the as-yet-undocumented stack class, which allows two (or more) images to be placed side-by-side.

Despite the fact that all of the above can be achieved with Thesis 1.0, in my personal opinion, it’s not yet easy enough to do. I’m working on an upgrade to the options panel that will allow you to select the type of layout you want – two column, for instance – as well as the sidebar arrangement, etc. Simply put, you’ll be able to modify the layout without having to deal with code, and hopefully, that will bring a previously-unseen level of layout control to average users.

Chris Pearson

Aski — Thesis 1.0 is set up for internationalization, but it needs community members to contribute specific .po files for translation into different languages.

Kali — Your content will “flow” into any and all Thesis layouts, but you will have to utilize custom fields on individual posts if you intend to make the the most of the forthcoming magazine style. You’ll be able to go back and add these fields at any time, so it should be no trouble at all.

Andrew — Heh, that’s the funniest thing I’ll read today.

gregory

thanks for your time chris, and can the main column be centered?

Chris Pearson

gregory — Not right now, but possibly in a future release.

RichlyScented

Thanks Chris for such a strong, solid theme.

Great product… kudos for such a fine job!

Michael

Hello Chris,

Fantastic product, but. . . . I build Wordpress Blogs to “flip.” Can I use the developers license, or will each one of my buyers need to buy a personal license?

Chris Pearson

Michael — In that setup, your buyers would actually need licenses themselves. This is not such a bad thing, though, because with the new DIYthemes affiliate program, you can earn cash for each customer your sign up!

Ryan

Keep up the good work!

Mary

Pod Casts? We use your Neoclassical Theme, but would like more flexibility in how the post pages display. (Sounds like your upcoming magazine theme might work for this) We would especially like to create a different look for Pod Cast pages – no sidebars. Is this possible using Thesis or will it be possible using you magazine theme?

Andreas

What about translating the theme to German – how can I do that easily?

Chris Pearson

Mary — With Thesis 1.0.2, you can create a custom look for particular pages through the use of the page-specific classes discussed above. In future releases, you’ll be able to customize individual posts through a similar piece of functionality.

Andreas — Thesis 1.0+ is set up for internationalization, but I suppose it would make things easier if I built a skeleton translation file. If you’re not familiar with the process, I’d encourage you to look into this further to see how it’s done.

Jerry

Hey Chris,

I come from a Joomla user’s background, where everything is modular and dead-on simple. You don’t have to know ANY code. It seems that WP isn’t that way and to make a site decent you have to know CSS, HTML, PHP (did I miss anything?) to generate great results. I just don’t have time and probably not enough brain cells to do that.

Any chance you can create an “idiot’s guide” to Thesis, in print or even better, screen-capture video, to show how to put those 4-6 lines of CSS in to do this or that, etc?

Obviously, your showcase features users who do know code or who paid somebody to make Thesis dance. I wouldn’t mind paying a good coder to customize Thesis but I would like to know how to do the easy stuff so I don’t have to yell for a coder every day to make small changes.

Anyway, it’s a beautiful theme and I’d like to use it for at least one site and probably more — but I need a smooth road to travel on this. Hope you can help. Thanks.

Eran Malloch

Hi Chris,

A really nice looking theme that I am very seriously considering purchasing. The alternative is the new City theme from Revolution, but yours is slightly ahead at the moment… :-)

One question though: I really want a WP theme that has a left hand menu (ala categories & pages column), since eye tracking studies have shown that this is the primary location of the “golden triangle”…

Is there plans to modify thesis to allow us to have left hand columns (or, preferrably, 3 column, 1 left & 1 right)? I don’t particularly like the “typical” Right hand column look n feel that most blogs have. Plus, if it’s well done, a LH column makes a site look less like a blog and more like a “traditional” website…

In my case, the main reason for wanting this, aside from the top LHS being the primary spot visitor eyes go to, is that I want a place to make it easier for visitors to browse categories and find old posts, when a normal blog isn’t the easiest way to achieve this result (because often the cats/pages menu is hidden below the fold on the RHS of the page, etc).

If I had (say) 5-6 primary categories, and 50-100 posts under each, I want visitors to be easily able to look through the category page for each and see all my past posts, rather than just rely on the search function.

I’m on of those folks who prefer to use WP as a CMS rather than as a (time-based) blog, and this helps overcome the std WP weakness in this area.

Anyway, hope this comment wasn’t too long winded ;-) but definitely interested to hear your answer to this one.

regards

Eran Malloch
Perth, Western Australia

Serge

Hello Chris,

I’m considering updating my blog template with either Thesis or another professional theme. But before I purchase, I’d like to ask a few questions.

1. Can I modify the left column width? I read on the forum that it will be possible or already is but I’d like to know how wide I can make that left column. I often show pictures in blogposts and they are 600 pixels wide. Is this possible in the current version?

2. Can I modify the right column width where the two sidebars are located? Can I drop a sidebar?

3. Can I change the location of the multimedia box?

4. Within a blogpost can I show the category in which I posted the article?
–> Posted by Chris Pearson on July 8, 2008 in (or filed under): “namecategory1″ and “namecategory2″ …

5. Can I add two multimedia boxes? (on for video, one for rotating images, etc.)

6. Can I rename the pages in the nav menu?

7. Is Thesis compatible with a Flickr RSS Wordpress plugin?

Thanks!

Serge

(ps: I couldn’t find a form or mail address to contact you; even in the forum I couldn’t register before purchasing the theme so I couldn’t post my questions over there! Is this a normal procedure??)

Jerry

Chris,

Know you’re busy, but maybe you can get an experienced user who is part of your support team to reply to questions. A lot of time passes between question and reply.

Not complaining, but without being able to access the forum and query existing users we have no ability to come to informed decisions unless we get answers from this page. Obviously, I’m interested and it seems many more are as well.

I think I’m close to buying but, as stated in my last message to you, I will still need an experienced Thesis hand to guide me or do some work for me. That info is holding me back at present.

Thanks.

Héctor

Hi Chris,

I’m starting to play around with plugin “Slickr Gallery” I really like this plugin. There are some few themes that work already well with this plugin (I’m testing misty-look today) . Does Thesis theme work well with Slickr Gallery as well as Lightbox 2 plugins?

Thanks/Héctor

Rick Beckman

Serge: Let me see if I can answer your questions for you. I’m Chris’ official support person but I don’t always see questions here — I mostly monitor the forums. Hopefully this will talk you into getting Thesis. :)

1. Can I modify the left column width? I read on the forum that it will be possible or already is but I’d like to know how wide I can make that left column. I often show pictures in blogposts and they are 600 pixels wide. Is this possible in the current version?

That is possible with some relatively minor tweaks to the custom.css file. After your purchase, poke me on the support forums (username: KingdomGeek) and I’d be happy to whip up the solution for you.

(And speaking of the support forums, I get most users’ questions answered within 24 hours, many within just a few hours from when they are posted. Support isn’t something Thesis users have to worry about!)

2. Can I modify the right column width where the two sidebars are located? Can I drop a sidebar?

Yes. Yes. While all of this will likely be a lot easier in future versions of Thesis, it has already come up some on the forums, and again, I’d be happy to get something working for you. I just don’t want to clutter this thread with code; hope you understand. :D

3. Can I change the location of the multimedia box?

It would require some hacking of core Thesis files and altering of the relevant CSS to get it to work out, but yeah, it can be moved.

4. Within a blogpost can I show the category in which I posted the article?
–> Posted by Chris Pearson on July 8, 2008 in (or filed under): “namecategory1″ and “namecategory2″ …

That can be added in by hacking core files easily enough.

5. Can I add two multimedia boxes? (on for video, one for rotating images, etc.)

Not without even further hacking of not just core files but also likely of the functions which handle the multimedia box.

6. Can I rename the pages in the nav menu?

Absolutely.

7. Is Thesis compatible with a Flickr RSS Wordpress plugin?

It’ll display that plugin’s widget just fine, but you may need to add some custom styling to get it to look pretty — chances are, it’ll display the thumbnails in a pile without any sort of whitespace between the images.

Rick Beckman

Héctor: No reason why Thesis shouldn’t work with those plugins. A few stylistic tweaks may be necessary, but we on the support forum would be happy to help out.

Rick Beckman

Jerry: Regarding the prominence of the left-hand side, it is that very reason why Thesis has its content on the left. Your viewers are there for your content, and your site should encourage their eyes to flow directly to it. I’m not for sure how easy or feasible it would be to flip the sidebars to the other side or whether or not such will be possible in future Thesis versions. Chris has hinted at a soon-ish release date to me, but I won’t say when just in case.

Links to categories can be added very easily via WordPress widgets to Thesis’ sidebars in an above-the-fold position just underneath the multimedia box. (In my browser, anyway, that wouldn’t require any scrolling to see.)

I’d suggest reading What Every Blogger Needs to Know About Categories by Chris; he very likely coded Thesis with it in mind.

I can’t promise an attractive solution for left-hand sidebars, but I can promise we’ll do our best to make you satisfied in your purchase. If you’re convinced, get Thesis and put us to the test. :) If not, then we hope you’ll reconsider in the future!

Serge

Rick,

Thank you for the answers. I don’t have much technical knowledge concerning css and web programming so after purchasing I will certainly need your help on tweaking or “hacking” the code :-)

Rick Beckman

Serge: Then I hope that means you’ll be purchasing Thesis? If so, welcome to the family!

Rob Lawrence

I am very interested in this theme. Any idea on ETA for the new changes? Or the magazine theme? Also, can this theme be fully integrated with vBulletin? Let me know, I am very interested. Thanks!

Rick Beckman

Rob: Chris may lynch me for spilling the beans, but he has hinted at a period within a month for the next version of Thesis. Whether this includes the magazine variant, I’m not sure. We’ll both be surprised. :)

At the time, any release dates are tentative, so don’t hold him to anything. :)

As for vBulletin… While I’m sure it *can* be adapted to fit vBulletin — it’d certainly be better than the horrible default vBulletin theme! — no one that I know of has done so yet.

Here’s hoping you take the plunge and get Thesis! :D

Rob Lawrence

Can you explain the new menu system coming to the theme? Is it going to be a drop down style like the one on the Revolution themes? I have a lot of buttons and menu items I want to have but thesis theme seems like it might limit this due to space. Any suggestions? Can I add my own menu system to the theme, any easy way to do this?

Rick Beckman

Unfortunately, no, I can’t explain the upcoming one. Chris’ secrets are his own. :P

Thesis is set up so that a one-line header menu looks best, but I don’t think there’s any actual limit — just not sure how pretty it is when the line wraps.

That said, you can add as many buttons and links as you want to the sidebar via WordPress widgets.

Keeping the # of links in the header to a small # is a very good thing for users who may be browsing on cell phones or other limited browsers. They’ll get to your content a lot quicker if they don’t have to skip over many links.

Will

The question and answer below confuses me a bit. Maybe by flip it is meant to set up a domain and blog and then sell it whole to a third party? If so, than I guess that is different than what I have seen in answers to other questions where if you have the developers license you can be hired to develop, administer or maintain a site for a client and use Thesis and the basis for that work. Am I misunderstanding the correct use of the developers license?

Fantastic product, but. . . . I build Wordpress Blogs to “flip.” Can I use the developers license, or will each one of my buyers need to buy a personal license?
69 Chris Pearson 07.24.08 at 12:52 pm

Michael — In that setup, your buyers would actually need licenses themselves. This is not such a bad thing, though, because with the new DIYthemes affiliate program, you can earn cash for each customer your sign up!

Gregor Gable

Hi,
Wow :-}. great theme, I will be transferring my blog , to my website. At that point I can use your Theme? Right.
Kind, Regards, Gregor
Nuclear and Indigenous Items of Interest blog http://gregornot.wordpress.com/

Chris Pearson

Rob — Stylistic integration with vBulletin is something that’s down the road on the development cycle, but it is certainly a base I want to cover. I wouldn’t expect anything on that front before the end of 2008, though (but you may get lucky!).

Regarding the nav menu, I will likely be breaking it up into two separate parts. One menu will be just like the nav menu now, and its purpose will be to house links to major internal pages and also links to external pages. The second menu (likely located underneath the title and above the content area of the layout) will be intended for categories, and I will eventually provide drop-down support for sub-categories.

Will — I’m not sure I understand your question completely, but the bottom line is that you cannot exploit the developer’s license in a high turnover environment. For instance, hosting companies routinely offer 1-click WordPress installations that include tons of themes. Some of these same companies want to offer Thesis to their clients, and in this case, a developer’s license would obviously not be adequate.

I interpreted Michael’s situation of “building to flip” as much less customized, hands-off type of environment. Using Thesis to help you create a standards-compliant, customized design for a client is fine; using it to sell sites at face value is not. To put it another way, if you can command a reasonable sum for a “custom design” using Thesis, then a developer’s license is fine. If you simply slap a theme up and turn over a site for something like a hundred bucks, then no—that would be exploiting the developer’s license.

Chris Pearson

Gregor — As long as your new site is not on WordPress.com (in other words, if it is self-hosted), then you’ll be able to apply Thesis.

Brian

Is it ok to buy this theme and use it outside of wordpress? i.e. use the markup/css/theme on a completely separate site. Obviously I would have to modify elements of the code myself, but I was just wondering if this is allowed?

thanks,

Chris Pearson

Brian — Sure, definitely. Just out of curiosity, are you planning on porting the theme to another CMS platform?

Brian

No, I was planning on incorporating elements of it into a website that I am developing. It may or may not work out, but i’ll send you a link if it does.

thanks,

Chris Pearson

Brian — Sounds good to me.

Handig

Hi,

How easy is it to implement more fancy nav menu’s with Thesis?
And can the search box be placed right next to the nav menu?

I would like something like this or this.

Max Forlani

Hi,

I’m about to buy Thesis, but have a few questions which I hope you can answer before the weekend, so I can implement Thesis in the weekend:

- a silly one to start with, can I customize it into a 4-column design, with 185 px column on the far left? If you look at my current side, I would like to move the nav pane to the left, so visitors don’t only see adds and the main article above the fold?
- can the 125×125 placeholder be customized to hold 3 instead of 6 adds?
- can I implement another ‘widget’ that spans both right columns (just like the 125×125 placeholder) to create a Most Popular space (wich would be above the fold, hence bringing the 125×125 spaceholder a bit down?
- does the header has to be as high as it is in most testimonail cases, or does that depend on the background pic?
- and finally, is Thickbox possible and built-in as an image viewer?

Kind regards,
Max

Chris Pearson

Handig — As of version 1.0.2, Thesis does not include built-in support for those types of nav menus, so they would be fairly difficult to implement. As far as the search box is concerned, you’ll have a lot more placement options in future releases of the theme.

Max — Here we go, in order:

  1. By default, Thesis does not support a 4-column arrangement, and given the nature of the theme, I would advise against attempting to perform this kind of modification yourself. In addition to being difficult, it would make future upgrades an absolute nightmare.
  2. As of version 1.0.2, Thesis does not include out-of-the-box support for 125×125 ads, and the ones you’ve seen out in the wild are the product of users’ own customizations. You can find lots of info on incorporating 125×125 ads in the forums, and because you’ll be implementing this yourself, you’ll be able to serve as many ads as you like.
  3. You cannot span both sidebar columns with Thesis 1.0.2, but the next version will include a hook that will allow you to do just that.
  4. The header can be any size you like.
  5. You can incorporate any third party image viewer you like, as most do not require any sort of styling support from themes. I’ve used Lightbox, for instance, and found that it integrated seamlessly without the need for additional styles.

Max Forlani

Hi Chris,

thanks for the elaborate and quick response. This leaves me with only one question: when do you expect to release version 1.02?

Cheers,
Max

Chris Pearson

Max — The next version of Thesis will be 1.1, and I hope to release it within the next couple of weeks.

Aseem Kishore

This may be a stupid question, but can I choose how many sidebars I want in the Options panel? Instead of two, just one and the content area will automatically grow to fill the empty space?

Thanks

Chris Pearson

Aseem — You can’t do it in 1.0.2, but you’ll be able to do it in 1.1. The behavior will be a little different than you’ve described, though, simply because the content column won’t grow to fill the empty space. Instead, the entire layout will become skinnier, but you’ll still be able to select the width of the content column if you want to make that a little bit wider.

Aseem Kishore

That’s great! I’ll be waiting for 1.1 before buying because I definitely need that functionality. And I’m guessing the sidebar width can also be adjusted?

Also, this is more of a feature request, but is it possible to throw in the option of placing a dom tab into the sidebar using widgets? dom tabs are so useful in terms of saving space and since it’s open source code, it would be VERY cool if that could somehow be an option in Thesis!

Secondly, another fabulous feature would be to integrate some kind of functionality that I can drop any code I want into a box and then tell it where to display on my post, i.e. top left, middle, bottom, etc. So I can just paste some Adsense code and tell it where to display. I know there are plugins that can do this, but since Thesis is taking care of so much already, it would be freakin awesome if it that was built in too!

Aseem Kishore

Is there an option to not show then entire post in Category and Archives view? If I only want to show only the first few lines of the post, is that possible? Also for the home page?

Chris Pearson

Aseem — Yes, the sidebar widths will also be adjustable in Thesis 1.1. Also, I completely agree that the multimedia box would be a great place for a dom tab selector like you’ve described, and that’s going to make its way into a future release for sure. I can’t guarantee that it’ll make 1.1, but it will debut shortly thereafter at the very least.

Regarding post insertion points, Thesis 1.1 will include no fewer than two hooks that will allow for insertion both above and below your posts. I’m working on a nicer way of implementing these, though, as custom fields are doable but not necessarily ideal. Also, your idea about placing AdSense in the middle of posts is intriguing—I’ll definitely tinker with this and see what I can come up with.

Finally, in response to your question from comment #104, you cannot choose your views on archive pages in Thesis 1.0.2; however, in 1.1, you’ll be able to choose to serve titles and bylines instead of entire posts, as this is desirable from both a usability and optimization standpoint. In addition, you’ll be able to serve excerpts if you like.

Regarding the home page, I’m leaving control of that up to you. Personally, I think using true excerpts (with the_excerpt()) on the home page is a poor choice. Instead, I recommend using the <--more--> tag to create “teasers.” This results in output similar to the excerpt, except that it’s styled much nicer.

Aseem Kishore

Chris, that is simply wonderful. I would pay $200 for a theme with all of those features! I’m really excited about 1.1.

I have one more question for you…sorry for suggesting features in the comments, but since I don’t own the theme yet, I could not post in the forums.

Anyway, can you place an option so that when you click on a category, instead of just displaying each post one after the other and then paging the rest of the posts out (which is the typcial way in Wordpress) to instead also allow you to simply have one page that has links to all the posts in that category. Maybe another category page template.

I’ve learned this is actually way better because the normal way of paging in Wordpress means that after the first few pages, i.e. \category\page2, the PageRank juice does not get passed on.

However, if you click on a category and get a listing of ALL the posts in the category on one page, then the PR is passed to even the oldest posts equally.

This would be another great SEO optimization feature in Thesis if there was that option! An example of a site that does something similar is HowToGeek.com. He uses tags, but ALL of his pages have good PR because of the internal link structure he has built.

Thanks man! This theme is super bad ass…can’t wait for more!

Kingdom Geek

Aseem: That would only be a good idea for categories with not many posts. Google may ignore all the links on the page if there are a lot of them — then none of the posts will receive the link juice that you’re wanting. Paged archives shouldn’t be abandoned so quickly. :)

Aseem Kishore

hahahaha Yeah actually, I had thought about that before writing it, the whole Google rule of no more than 100 links per page, etc. Your point is definitely correct.

How about a paging archives with just links instead of entire posts or even excerpts of post? So maybe 30 links on each page or a custom number you can choose? Also, this would be a secondary template, so you could pick between normal or just links.

Thanks for the quick responses.

Kingdom Geek

There’s been that request made on the board many times. I haven’t had a chance to come up with a working template for that, though.

What I’ve envisioned is using WordPress’ template hierarchy to create a category.php file that users can change to category-1.php or whatever cat. ID # they want the template to apply to (leaving it as category.php if they want it to apply to all templates).

I think the PHP code would be easy enough to work out for this, but getting it styled may trip me up a bit. When I finish merging my development files onto this new comp, I’ll start working up a good solution for this request. It’s been a popular request, and I don’t want to let any of you down!

Max Forlani

Hi Chris,

could you tell me what Lightbox version you tested and worked fine? I’m using Thickbox, but that seems to give a script warning in both IE and Firefox:

Error: $(domChunk) is null
Source File: ThickBox file
Line: 21

I also get the following error, no clue where it comes from though:

Error: [Exception... "Component returned failure code: 0x80004005 (NS_ERROR_FAILURE) [nsIDOMLocation.hostname]” nsresult: “0×80004005 (NS_ERROR_FAILURE)” location: “JS frame :: chrome://ytoolbar/content/ytoolbarOverlay.js :: yahooGetKeyWord :: line 501″ data: no]
Source File: chrome://ytoolbar/content/ytoolbarOverlay.js
Line: 501

Thanks a lot,
Max

Max Forlani

Hi Chris,

you can disregard the previous comment. I found and installed the latest version of Lightbox (2.04), which works well in Firefox, but gives an error in IE (to such an extend that it doesn’t load the home page!)

It comes and say that the operation is aborted. At that point, I’m not even trying to load a picture. When I deleted the Lightbox specific four lines of code from the header, the pages loads without problems.

When you said you tried it out, did you try it out in all versions?

Kind regards,
Max

Chris Pearson

Max — When I tested Lightbox, it worked in every browser. The Lightbox-specific lines in the header are necessary for the plugin to function properly, and if you deleted those, I would expect it to fail entirely.

You should try deactivating all other plugins, uploading and activating a fresh version of Lightbox, and then trying it again. It’s possible that one of your other plugins is causing a conflict, and at least this way, you could attempt to solve the problem by process of elimination.

Finally, I noticed earlier that you had attempted to install Thickbox inside the /thesis directory. If you’re installing a true plugin, then it must reside in your /wp-content/plugins directory; this could have been why you experienced problems with that particular plugin.

Also, if you have more to say on this topic, please do so over in the forums. Thanks!

Arvind

Dear Chris:

I have purchased Thesis and I am planning on using it.

Do you think it will be possible to use one theme for one section of the wesbsite and thesis for another. I am very new to wordpress. Can you share some thoughts on how to do it?

With warm regards,
Arvind

Peter Beck

Chris — back after a busy hiatus, query about the multimedia box:

Way back when, I asked about whether a site could display images thusly — having the multimedia box be the only image on the home page, as per the default Thesis theme, and the image displayed on the home page being the image “associated” with the most recent blog entry. But when any given post is gone to directly, having the image displayed in the multimedia box be the image “associated” with that post.

Does Thesis support this option, now? As you may recall, this request came about because I put images at the top of nearly all my blog posts, and didn’t want these to clash with the multimedia box.

Fred

Chris,
I like the update. How do you get VBulletin to link smoothly with thesis? I am having problems getting it to work right, and when I click the back button it gets hung up. Any suggestions.

thanks
fred

Chris Pearson

Peter — You can use the image or custom custom fields to associate an image with a particular post, but these images will only show on those individual pages themselves. In other words, the image on the home page will not be the image associated with the most recent post.

Because you routinely use images with your posts, I’d recommend removing the multimedia box by default, and only allowing it to show on individual posts and pages (where there is an image in one of the custom fields).

Fred — I’m using an aMember plugin to connect my member database to vBulletin, and WordPress is actually completely removed from the process. As such, there’s no “link” with Thesis outside of a regular old HTML link that connects the two. I suspect your problems are the result of something else (perhaps a script is failing to load properly, or something along those lines).

Peter Beck

Chris – thank you. But I like the design of Thesis so much, it’d be a shame to deactivate the multimedia window.

Since the image associated with a particular post is currently separate from the multimedia window, is there a coding option for the multimedia window, to display the default image (or video, or rotation thru a set of images), *unless* there’s an image associated with the current post, in which case use that one?

Chris Pearson

Peter — That’s how the current setup works. If you utilize a custom field to associate an image with a post, you’ll see that image. Otherwise, you’ll see the default (whether that’s an image, a video, or custom code).

Peter Beck

Understood — but is that true also of the main, home page for the blog?

I like the idea of the blog’s home page displaying an image in the multimedia window, and the listed posts underneath not showing any images. But when going to a specific post, having the MMW showing a specified image associated with that post. So far so good.

Is there a (relatively easy) way, though, to have the image associated with the most recent blog post be the image that displays at any given time on the home page’s MMW?

Chris Pearson

Peter — Right now, no, there’s no easy way to do that.

Peter Beck

Thank you for checking :)

If a way occurs to you…

Handig

Hi,
Looking forward to the Cosmo theme. Can’t wait though. When will it be available?
What will be the impact to the content of the posts if I start allready with Thesis and upgrade my website later to Cosmo? E.g. with regard to alligning pictures.

Max

Greetings. I’ve been looking for a premium WP theme which includes Flickr and, more importantly, YouTube integration. Does this theme provide that sort of functionality? Is their admin support for those options? If so, I’m interested. Thank you.

Chris Pearson

Handig — Assuming you start with Thesis, your post content will be largely unaffected. Image styles between the two themes will be identical (in terms of how they are called upon), so that won’t be a problem. Essentially, you’ll simply have to add things to your posts to take full advantage of Cosmo. For instance, you may add a post thumbnail image and also categorize it in a particular way to have it show up in a certain location on the home page.

Max — Both Flickr and YouTube are pretty standard, and in all honesty, you can integrate them both into just about any theme. One slight edge that Thesis may have over the competition here is the multimedia box, because you can embed videos into that area through the Thesis options panel. Best of all, you simply have to copy and paste the YouTube video embed code, so no technical knowledge or template editing is required.

bhatnaturally

Chris, a big ‘thank you’ for all your hard work on Thesis. And thanks for considering a magazine theme. In the Thesis is there a way to highlight the featured post (similar to your author comments here)?

Chris Pearson

bhatnaturally — At this time, there is not a way to highlight a featured post. However, once Cosmo is released, both Thesis and Cosmo will share a similar “featured post” functionality.

Amit Verma

Hi Chris,
Multimedia box isn’t reading images with extension in UPPER case (reading “jpg” but not “JPG”). It is not displaying even in the Thesis theme options.

Cheers,
Amit

NB

Hey Chris,

Bought your theme yesterday, love it.

However, I did not find a .po file for localization. Is there one? Do you plan to create one?
I noticed that a couple of other users inquired about it too.

Amit

Hi Chris,
Do we have CSS for print?
Thanks,
Amit

Chris Pearson

Amit — I’ll fix the .JPG extension issue in the next release. Also, there is no specialized CSS file for print at this time, but it is on the development list and should debut soon.

NB — Admittedly, I had been holding out in hopes that a member of the community who has experience with localization would construct a .po file. Since that hasn’t happened yet, and since I’ve gained a little better understanding of how all that works, I’m going to spend some time in September putting a .po file together.

Ben

Chris or Rick, hello – I’m considering Thesis, but what I really want is the magazine version….in the meantime I *could* use 1.0 if I could do certain things. BTW, I want to use this for a consulting business and have a blog on an inner page with a separate home page.

Could I use 1.0 (and obviously 1.1) as a kind of a CMS – in other words, could I have the home page have 1 “post” with subheads, without the date and author stamps (and I might change this from time to time), and could I have a separate blog with nonoverlapping content on an inner page? Of course, other inner pages would be a bio page, a services page, etc.

Can I do this easily with 1.0? If so, I’ll buy now. I think small business is a very, very large market that you should address. Thanks

Chris Pearson

Ben — Small business is why I’m here; moreover, there’s no law that stipulates that every small business must have a magazine-style layout. The primary goals of any small business on the Web ought to be to engage their audience and to establish a strong search presence, and those are two areas in which Thesis absolutely excels.

Now, regarding your home page, you can turn your bylines (author stamps and date) on and off through the options panel, and best of all, you can change these settings at any time without actually affecting your post/page content. Also, by employing the use of a static homepage (a standard WordPress feature), you can achieve exactly the effect you’re after—”a separate blog with nonoverlapping content on an inner page.”

In my opinion, the things you’re trying to do are easy to achieve with WordPress + Thesis, and if you get stuck along the way, we’ll be glad to help you get past any and all obstacles!

Ben

thanks very much for your prompt reply – VERY fast follow up – would I be able to set up a home page and have an inner page be the blog…but have the blog posts show on the home page in one of the columns, like a feed, or a “news” section? Or would I have to manually update that static page every time I wanted to feature a blog post on my home page?

Chris Pearson

Ben — You could use the Thesis recent posts widget to display links to your latest posts in the sidebar, and that way, you’d still have access to those from the home page. This would essentially be the same thing as a “feed” of your latest articles, and best of all, it would be completely automated.

Fred

Ben,

I would just get thesis- I looked a lot of themes and I am still happy with the total package: theme, support, and community. I am still working on my site, and been able to do a lot more customizing than your talking about. You certainly can not complain about the price you have to pay. To me it was a easy decision.

Fred

Adam Teece

This looks like a very very nice theme. Once I really get going with my blogging I might have to buy it. First I have to make myself blog more regularly though. New podcast I am working on should help though.

Adam Teece

My friends and I are starting a podcast soon and we wanted a nice clean website. Do you think this will work very well for a podcast theme? Thinking about using PodPress for it, but not sure.

Metta

Chris,

I apologize in advance if I’m missing something obvious here, but is there a place where I can see the current archive functionality displayed?

I know there is discussion in the comments here about archive features that will be added, but right now, with a quick review of this demo, I haven’t been able to find the current archive display options.

Thanks,
Metta

nanda

Please contact on my mail, I received an email with download to this theme (I registered at some sites with news about themes for wordpress), Now I do not know if it is a demo version or piracy. I can tell you the link. I´m a brasilian girl, sorry my bad English.

Chris Pearson

Nanda — That’s definitely piracy, because Thesis is not free. If you like, you can email me the site at diythemes [at] gmail [dot] com.

Chris Pearson

Adam — PodPress should be implemented in combination with a WordPress theme… I happen to be partial to Thesis, but you probably knew that!

Metta — When we discuss “archives” around here, we’re primarily talking about category archive pages… For instance, here’s the Thesis News category archive page from this site.

Right now, that page displays much like your homepage—posts are shown in their entirety unless they’ve been turned into teasers with the <--more--> tag (a standard WordPress feature). In the next version of Thesis, you’ll be able to choose other options for displaying your category archive pages. At this time, the available options are slated to be:

  • Titles and bylines only (better for SEO and for quick navigation)
  • Full posts, which is how the theme is currently set up
  • Excerpts, which can be auto-generated or controlled by you using the Excerpt field on the post editing screen

Ned Carey

Chris,

You wrote:
>Also, by employing the use of a static homepage (a standard WordPress feature)

How do you do that? Would the static home page be the same theme (set up as a page?) or would I have to create the static page from scratch.

Thanks,
PS: I have thesis but haven’t implemented it yet.

Kingdom Geek

Hey, Ned, to use a static home page you need to create a page in WordPress — just like any other page — then you can set that page as the home in Settings -> Reading. You can create a blank page and then use it for your blog posts as well (in the same Reading panel).

Ned Carey

Thank you rick

Doug C.

The /images thing isn’t working for me. I saved all my site images in the images folder, but they don’t show up. They show up if I type in the entire path name. Any suggestions?

Also, how do you add a custom favicon to this theme? I’ve tried the various tutorials that say to add….

…into the Header Scripts box, but this isn’t working for me, either.

Doug C.

Sorry, I forget to parse that part of my comment.

Also, how do you add a custom favicon to this theme? I’ve tried the various tutorials that say to add….

<link rel=”icon” type=”image/gif” href=”animated_favicon.gif” >

…into the Header Scripts box, but this isn’t working for me, either.

Rick Beckman

You don’t have to do *anything* to add a favicon other than adding the file to your site. Name it favicon.ico, drop it in the root of your site (so that you can view it at example.com/favicon.ico), and enjoy. That’s all. Not all browsers catch it immediately — some take a while to show it — but that’s all you have to do to have a favicon. Doesn’t matter what you’re using to run your site or which theme you’re using. :)

Doug C.

Well, it’s been in my root directory this whole time and it never appeared on the site. I added the code for it to the header.php file and now it’s up there.

Doug C.

Any ideas why the /images aren’t working?

Rick Beckman

If you aren’t using the name “favicon.ico” (which it looks like you’re using “animated_favicon.gif”), then it won’t be automatic. The standards are there for a reason — they make things easier. :)

For your other question, check out the support board.

Doug C.

The “animated-favicon.gif” was in there because I swapped it off the page it was on to show it here as an example. Anyway, I named mine something different, but that’s beside the point.

You were wrong about “You don’t have to do *anything* to add a favicon other than adding the file to your site. ” And now it seems you won’t help me with the other issue and you’re pointing me to some forum. Nice.

It’s sad I’ll have to seek help elsewhere because I can’t get it from the theme designer.

Rick Beckman

I’m not the theme designer. ;) I contributed some code to it earlier this year/last year and spent some time on the support side of things, but that’s it. The theme designer set up a support board for a reason. You’re the one asking for support on a blog entry rather than using the designated support path. ;)

And no, I’m not wrong about the Favicons. They just work, assuming you created the file correctly, named it correctly, and uploaded it to the correct spot. I promise you that. Meta tags only help a few browsers.

Doug C.

My apologies to Chris Pearson. I thought that Beckman character was the designer of Thesis.

KingdomGeek

You’re not the only one to have made that mistake. No worries. :D

Annette31Reese

People in the world take the mortgage loans in various banks, because it’s easy.