Let’s talk about pain.

Specifically, let’s talk about the pain that we’ve all felt while working with our web designs. If you’ve run a website for any length of time, I’m betting you’ve felt…

  • Insecure about giving FTP and WordPress login details to a designer
  • Worried about making new design changes or implementing new design elements
  • Frustrated by how time-consuming and difficult it is to create a design on a development server and then move it over to a live server
  • Devastated when you lost design work and were unable to recover it

Thanks to the new Skin Manager and a clever little feature called Preview Mode, Thesis 2.0.1 is turning these pain points into areas of unprecedented control and stability.

Those negative emotions I listed above? They’re all tied to 3 specific problems—the 3 dragons of web design.

Let’s take a closer look at these dragons and see how Thesis turns web design weaknesses into strengths. [click to continue…]

Late last night, the brand-new DIYthemes web design (and pricing structure) went live.

And I may be biased, but I think it looks AMAZING.

You can now see all of the benefits of Thesis 2.0 (and how they help you).

Before I walk you through all of the changes, and answer your questions, take a look at this quick screenshot:

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Last night, just before the clock struck midnight, Chris Pearson released Thesis 2.0.

You can download it when you log in to your DIYthemes membership, but before you do that, read this.

As you’ll soon see, it’s not just a “new paint job.” Chris rebuilt the ENTIRE engine.

The. Whole. Thing.

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There are 3 things that you’ll find in every GREAT web design…

  1. Pixel-perfect typography (that’s both easy to read AND scan)
  2. A custom 404 error page (so people who can’t find what they’re looking for can find it)
  3. Landing pages that CONVERT (gotta turn traffic into leads and sales, after all)

Before Thesis 2.0, getting each of these three things right took a considerable amount of “tinkering,” a developer, or additional software.

Not anymore.

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Well, folks—it’s been a wild ride.

The ride began in 2006, when I designed a theme called Cutline that became one of the most used themes on WordPress.com because of its simplicity, no-nonsense design, and typography.

That early success was great, but I realized there were many problems facing the theme space…problems I was going to have to solve if I wanted to make a theme millions of people could use over many years.

In 2008, I created Thesis to solve some of these problems. As you know, it quickly became the industry standard for premium WordPress themes, thanks to innovation in key areas.

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